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Contact

Department of Human Evolution

Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology

Deutscher Platz 6
04103 Leipzig

phone: +49 (341) 3550 - 350
fax: +49 (0341) 3550 - 399

e-mail: streiber@[>>> Please remove the brackets! <<<]eva.mpg.de

Dirk Hoffmann

Post-Doctoral Researcher

Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology
Department of Human Evolution
Deutscher Platz 6
04103 Leipzig
Germany

phone: 0049 (0) 341 3550 362
fax: 0049 (0) 341 3550 399
e-mail: dirk_hoffmann@[>>> Please remove the brackets! <<<]eva.mpg.de

 

 

Research Interests

Dirk Hoffmann is a research scientist in the geochronology section of the Archaeological Sciences group within the Department of Human Evolution and works on U-series dating of carbonates and applications in Archaeology and Earth Sciences.

He is a physicist (Dipl. phys., University of Heidelberg) and received his PhD (Dr. rer. nat.) in January 2002 at the Institute of Environmental Physics, University of Heidelberg. His work focusses on radiometric dating techniques applied to geochronology, palaeoclimate archives or archaeological sites and artefacts. He is a specialist in multi-collector (MC) inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) based U-series dating and particularly interested in analytical and technical aspects of mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS, TIMS), speleothem based palaeoclimate research, radiocarbon calibration using speleothems, U-series based chronology for archaeological sites and artefacts, age modelling for speleothem chronologies, or U-series dating of other marine and terrestrial archives such as corals, lake sediments or travertine.

Before coming to Leipzig, Dirk worked in the UK and Spain. In October 2002 he joined the Geography Department at the University of Bristol and was responsible for the set up of MC-ICPMS U-series dating in the Bristol Isotope Group laboratory. Between 2009 and 2014 he set up and directed a new MC-ICPMS U-series dating laboratory within the Geochronology section of the CENIEH in Burgos (Spain). Since May 2014 he is working in the Department of Human Evolution at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig. Current projects include, for example, U-series dating of calcite crusts covering cave art, chronologies for archaeological sites in Portugal, Spain and Germany or reconstructing the western Mediterranean palaeoclimate using stalagmites from Gibraltar, Portugal and Tunisia.