28.03.2017 - 17:56
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Contact

Department of Human Evolution

Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology

Deutscher Platz 6
04103 Leipzig

phone: +49 (341) 3550 - 350
fax: +49 (0341) 3550 - 399

e-mail: streiber@[>>> Please remove the brackets! <<<]eva.mpg.de

Patrick Arnold

Doctoral Student

Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology
Department of Human Evolution
Deutscher Platz 6
04103 Leipzig
Germany

phone: 0049 (0) 341 3550 768
fax: 0049 (0) 341 3550 399
e-mail: patrick_arnold@[>>> Please remove the brackets! <<<]eva.mpg.de

 

 

Research Interests

I am currently a PhD researcher in the Department of Human Evolution at the Max-Planck-Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and a PhD student in the Institute of Systematic Zoology and Evolutionary Biology with Phyletic Museum at the Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena. My primary research focuses on the evolution, biomechanics and functional morphology of motion system in vertebrates. I am particularly interested in the evolution of morphological diversity and motor patterns in the mammalian cervical spine in the context of the developmental constraints to only seven cervical vertebrae across all mammals.

During my Bachelor and Master studies at the University of Jena, I concentrated on multiple morphological 3D analysis and imaging techniques (e.g., geometric morphometrics, x-ray reconstruction of moving morphology - xromm, µCT, µMRT, laser scanning microscopy), the inference of joint mobility in fossil vertebrates and the regionalization of the mammalian axial skeleton. Analyzing cervical vertebrae with different morphological approaches enables crucial insides into the impact of head size, body posture and forelimb function onto the mobility and motion patterns of the head and neck.

My doctorial research in general seeks to understand how the cervical spine as one of the most constrained and static structure in mammals is subjected to functional and morphological variation in the course of mammalian diversification.

In my research project at the MPI EVA I compare the mobility and range of motion of the cervical spine of Neanderthals and anatomical modern humans using bone models and virtual experiments in the framework of the xromm approach. Given the evidences from vertebral and vestibular shape data it is tested whether Neanderthals potentially moved their heads and necks differently from AMHs.