17.09.2014 - 17:33
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Contact

Department of Linguistics

Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology
Deutscher Platz 6
D-04103 Leipzig
Germany


phone: +49 (0) 341 3550 - 300
fax: +49 (0) 341 3550 - 333

e-mail: cissewski@[>>> Please remove the brackets! <<<]eva.mpg.de

Grammaticalization and language typology
August 26, 2014 15:00
Speaker: Heiko Narrog (Tohoku University & MPI-EVA)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Grammaticalized 'Already' in Tense-Aspect Systems of Southeast Asia and Elsewhere
August 12, 2014 13:30
Speaker: Bruno Olsson (Nanyang Technological University, Singapore)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

On the Genesis of Ergativity in the Iranian Languages: Evidence from Modern Iranian Languages (Where Synchrony Reveals Diachrony)
July 29, 2014 13:30
Speaker: Mohammad Dabir-Moghaddam (Allameh Tabataba'i University (Teheran) & MPI-EVA)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Re-examining subject preference: Relative clause processing in ergative languages Monday, July 28, 15:00h
July 28, 2014 15:00
Speaker: Maria Polinsky (Harvard University & MPI-EVA)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Relative clause types in Turkish and how some of them are acquired. Based in part on joint work with Gabriella Hermon.
July 24, 2014 15:00
Speaker: Jaklin Kornfilt (Syracuse University (USA) & MPI-EVA)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Seminar room H4.10 / H4.11 (4th floor, on top of the lecture hall)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Diachronic stability of verbal morphology in Chibchan languages
July 23, 2014 15:00
Speaker: Matthias Pache (Leiden University & MPI-EVA)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Seminar room H 4.10 / H 4.11 (4th floor, on top of the lecture hall)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Excrescent Nasals in Malayic Languages of Western Sumatra
July 22, 2014 13:30
Speaker: David Gil & Tim Mckinnon
Work in progress at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Seminar room H 4.10 / H 4.11 (4th floor, on top of the lecture hall)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Noun-based and verb-based languages
July 21, 2014 15:00
Speaker: Johanna Nichols (UC Berkeley & MPI EVA)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Seminar room U1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Applicative/Causative Marking in Three Varieties of Sumatran Malayic
July 18, 2014 10:00
Speaker: Timothy McKinnon, Peter Cole, Gabriella Hermon and Yanti (University of Delaware, MPI-EVA Jakarta & Leipzig)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Seminar room H4.10 / H4.11 (4th floor, on top of the lecture hall)

Abstract:
http://wwwstaff.eva.mpg.de/~gil/applicatives/abstracts/McKinnonColeHermonYanti.pdf

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Diversity Linguistics Seminar
July 04, 2014 09:30
Speaker: Martin Haspelmath & Susanne Michaelis
Diversity Linguistics Seminar

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Location:
Seminar room H 4.10 /H 4.11 (4th floor, on top of the lecture hall)

Abstract:
Paper:
Næss, Åshild & Mathias Jenny. 2011. Who changes language? Bilingualism and structural change in Burma and the Reef Islands. Journal of Language Contact 4(2). 217–249. doi:10.1163/187740911X589253


Abstract:

In this paper we discuss two cases of contact-induced language change where lexical and grammatical borrowing appear to have gone in opposite directions: one language has borrowed large amounts of vocabulary from another while at the same time being the source of structural borrowings into the other language. Furthermore, it appears in both cases that the structural borrowing has come about through bilingualism in L1 speakers of the source language, while L1 speakers of the language undergoing the structural change are largely monolingual. We propose that these two unusual factors are not unrelated, but that the latter is the cause of the former: Under circumstances where the numerically much smaller language in a contact situation is the contact language, the L2 speakers' variety, influenced by their L1, may spread into the monolingual community. e lexical borrowing naturally happens from the bilingual speakers' L2 into their L1, resulting in opposite directions of lexical and structural borrowing. Similar processes have been described in cases of language shift, but we show that it may take place even in situations where shift does not occur.

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Diversity Linguistics Seminar
June 27, 2014 09:30
Speaker: Martin Haspelmath & Susanne Michaelis
Diversity Linguistics Seminar

more information

Location:
Seminar room H 4.10 / H 4.11 (4th floor, on top of the lecture hall)

Abstract:
Paper:
Forker, Diana. 2014. Are there subject anaphors? Linguistic Typology 18(1). 51–81.

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Conditions on inflection
June 26, 2014 15:00
Speaker: Greville Corbett (University of Surrey)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Seminar room H 4.10 / H 4.11 (4th floor, on top of the lecture hall)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Diversity Linguistics Seminar
May 30, 2014 09:30
Speaker: Martin Haspelmath & Susanne Michaelis
Diversity Linguistics Seminar

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Location:
Seminar room H 4.10/H 4.11 (4th floor, on top of the lecture hall)

Abstract:
Paper: Siegel, Jeff, Benedikt Szmrecsanyi & Bernd Kortmann. 2014. Measuring analyticity and syntheticity in creoles. Journal of Pidgin and Creole Languages 29(1). 49–85.

Abstract:

Creoles (here including expanded pidgins) are commonly viewed as being more analytic than their lexifiers and other languages in terms of grammatical marking. The purpose of the study reported in this article was to examine the validity of this view by measuring the frequency of analytic (and synthetic) markers in corpora of two different English-lexified creoles — Tok Pisin and Hawai‘i Creole — and comparing the quantitative results with those for other language varieties.

To measure token frequency, 1,000 randomly selected words in each creole corpus were tagged with regard to word class, and categorized as being analytic, synthetic, both analytic and synthetic, or purely lexical. On this basis, an Analyticity Index and a Syntheticity Index were calculated. These were first compared to indices for other languages and then to L1 varieties of English (e.g. standard British and American English and British dialects) and L2 varieties (e.g. Singapore English and Hong Kong English). Type frequency was determined by the size of the inventories of analytic and synthetic markers used in the corpora, and similar comparisons were made.

The results show that in terms of both token and type frequency of grammatical markers, the creoles are not more analytic than the other varieties. However, they are significantly less synthetic, resulting in much higher ratios of analytic to synthetic marking. An explanation for this finding relates to the particular strategy for grammatical expansion used by individuals when the creoles were developing.

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Darwin's last challenge
May 20, 2014 15:00
Speaker: Giuseppe Longobardi (University of York)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Seminar room H 4.10 / H.4.11 (4th floor, on top of the lecture hall)

Abstract:
Giuseppe Longobardi
Language and Linguistic Science
University of York

Darwin’s last challenge
Beyond its theoretical success, the development of molecular biology has brought about the possibility of extraordinary progress in the historical study of classification and distribution of different species and different human populations, introducing a new level of evidence (molecular genetic markers) apt, among other things, to quantitative and computational treatment. Even in the cognitive sciences, purely theoretical progress in a certain discipline, such as linguistics, may have analogous historical impact, equally contributing to Renfrew’s so-called ‘New Synthesis’. Thus, I will argue that the parallelism between the study of linguistic history and genetic evolution goes beyond methodological similarities, and may begin to encompass substantive results. Darwin (1859) had hypothesised that the ultimate genealogical tree of languages should correspond to the biological one of human populations: however, testing this challenging hypothesis has so far been practically impossible. Over the past 30 years, geneticists developed ever more sophisticated techniques to compare the biological layout of even distant populations, but this is not enough; so far linguists have relied on comparing words from different languages, to reconstruct their ancestry: this method, though sometimes extraordinarily successful, goes back in time for few millennia, too little to relate distant languages on a continental or global basis. However, fortunately, languages are not mere word lists, but also sets of abstract syntactic rules to combine words into correct sentences. Exploiting dramatic progress in the theory of universal grammar, I have developed for the past 10 years a radically new method to compare languages and quantify their distances in order to reconstruct their histories from syntactic differences/similarities. We are currently applying it successfully to areas as vast as Europe and parts of Asia. On these grounds, I am now beginning to cooperate with geneticists, within an interdisciplinary grant project, to finally compare genetically and linguistically distant populations, and we discovered that some results of the two disciplines may for the first time be correlated and hopefully complement each other for reconstructing more accurate histories of human culture and biology.

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Systems and uses of definite determiners: Syntactic and semantic conditions for patterns of variation
May 16, 2014 13:30
Speaker: Ekkehard König (FU Berlin & MPI-EVA)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Seminar room H 4.10 / H 4.11 (4th floor, on top of the lecture hall)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Romance grammatical gender in typological perspective
May 12, 2014 15:00
Speaker: Michele Loporcaro (University of Zurich & Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Primat. / Humevo (U2.50)

Contact:
Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology
Department of Linguistics
Deutscher Platz 6, 04103 Leipzig
Tel.: 03 41-35 50 300 / Fax: 03 41-35 50 333


E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/linguistics/events

Presentation of Akabea, a language of the Andaman Islands
April 28, 2014 15:00
Speaker: Raoul Zamponi (University of Macerata & MPI-EVA)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Is Siberia a linguistic area?
April 15, 2014 13:30
Speaker: Bernard Comrie
Work in progress at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Seminar room H 4.10/H 4.11 (4th floor, on top of the lecture hall)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Postnominal relative clauses in Basque: typology and diachrony
April 09, 2014 15:00
Speaker: Dorota Krajewska (University of the Basque Country & MPI-EVA)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Seminar room H 4.10 / H 4.11 (4th floor, on top of the lecture hall)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Agency in Bena Bena, a Papuan language from the Eastern Highlands of PNG
April 01, 2014 13:30
Speaker: Carola Emkow
Work in progress at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Seminar room H 4.10/H 4.11 (4th floor, on top of the lecture hall)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Corpus publication
March 26, 2014 09:00
Speaker: Susanne Michaelis et al.
Workshop at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Diversity, complexity and small-scale multilingualism: insights from Warruwi Community (Australia)
March 26, 2014 15:00
Speaker: Ruth Singer (University of Melbourne, Australia)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Seminar room H 4.10 / H 4.11 (4th floor, on top of the lecture hall)

Abstract:
Warruwi Community, Arnhem Land is one of the few places left in Australia where children grow up speaking numerous Australian Indigenous languages. This situation, which was apparently the norm before White contact, is often referred to as traditional multilingualism (Brandl & Walsh 1982, Wilkins & Nash 2008). However, the term traditional multilingualism has also used to describe the linguistic practices of highly multilingual communities in Papua New Guinea, Vanuatu and South American (Aikhenvald 2002, de Vries 2012, François 2012). What all these communities seem to have in common is:

· Community members each speak a number of Indigenous languages

· Each Indigenous languages has a small numbers of speakers (<5000)

· Marriages between people with different main languages is common

· Multiple languages are used within each family



Traditional multilingualism has come into the spotlight of international debates addressing questions such as: Why do smaller languages seem to have higher levels of complex linguistic features than larger features? (Lupyan & Dale 2010) and Were processes of language change in human prehistory different to those we can observe now? (Trudgill 2011). Some of the claims made in these debates rest on the nature of traditional multilingualism, thought to have been the norm in the small-scale human societies that existed througout much of human history. However we have very little detailed information about the practice of traditional multilingualism. In addition, it seems to be rapidly declining around the world, in tandem with the decline in the world’s linguistic diversity. This talk discusses the language practices associated with multlingualism at Warruwi Community with a view to developing a more sophisticated account of ‘traditional multilingualism’.

The term traditional multilingualism lacks a precise definition and is often used in relation to fairly anecdotal reports. The term egalitarian multilingualism suggested by Francois (2012) in relation to accounts of some Vanuatu communities could form the basis for a more precise defintion. The term egalitarian multilingualism contrasts the relatively equal social status of small Indigenous languages to one another with the more commonly studied situation of diglossia. Diglossia is a term that refers to languages in an unequal power relationship; one language such as English is tightly connected to institutional power, whereas another language such as Italian as spoken in Australia, is not connected to institutional power. The term diglossia encompasses the vast bulk of studies on multilingualism to date: relations between national languages and languages used by minorities, be they migrants or Indigenous people. The term ‘egalitarian multilingualism’ provides a neat opposition to diglossia. The connections between Indigenous languages to institutional power where they occur in Australia, tend to be relatively informal. A focus on egalitarian multilingualism reveals a need for work that ignores the national language and looks instead at the relationships that Indigenous languages have with one another.

This talk looks at the relationships between Indigenous languages at Warruwi Community. Although the set of languages spoken at Warruwi Community has changed since White contact, the way that multilingualism is practiced seems to reflect long standing practices underpinned by persisting language ideologies and attitudes to multilingualism. Refinements are proposed to Francois’ (2012) definition of egalitarian multilingualism to make it a more useful term. This refined definition may not apply to all the communities that have been said to practice ‘traditional multilingualism’.



Aikhenvald, Alexandra (2002). 'Traditional Multilingualism and Language Endangerment', pp. 24-33 of Language Maintenance for endangered languages: an active approach, edited by David Bradley and Maya Bradley. London: Curzon Press.

Brandl, M. M. & Michael Walsh (1982). Speakers of many tongues: toward understanding multilingualism among Aborginal Australians. International Journal of the Sociology of Language 36: 71-81.

De Vries, Lourens (2012). Speaking of clans: language in Awyu-Ndumut communities of Indonesian West Papua. International Journal of the Sociology of Language 214: 5-26.

Di Carlo, Pierpaolo (forthcoming). Multilingualism, solidarity and magic: new perspectives on language ideology in the Cameroonian grassfields.

Francois, Alex (2012). The dynamics of linguistic diversity: egalitarian multilingualism and power imbalance among northern Vanuatu languages. International Journal of the Sociology of Language 214: 85-110.

Lupyan, G. & R. Dale (2010). Language structure is partly determined by social structure. PLoS One 5.1: e8559.

Trudgill, Peter (2011). Sociolinguistic typology: the social determinants of linguistic complexity. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Wilkins, David P & David Nash (2008). The European ‘discovery’ of a multilingual Australia: the linguistic and ethnographic successes of a failed expedition. In McGregor, William (ed.) The history of research on Australian Aboriginal languages. Canberra: Pacific Linguistics. 485–50.

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Two NINJAL databases: a geo-typological database of transitivity alternations, and a database of Japanese verb-verb compounds
March 24, 2014 13:30
Speaker: Prashant Pardeshi (NINJAL Tokyo / MPI-EVA)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Seminar room H 4.10 / H 4.11 (4th floor, on top of the lecture hall)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Diversity Linguistics Seminar
March 14, 2014 09:30
Speaker: Martin Haspelmath & Susanne Michaelis
Diversity Linguistics Seminar

more information

Location:
Seminar room H4.10/H 4.11 (4th floor, on top of the lecture hall)

Abstract:
paper by Pieter Muysken, Modelling the Quechua-Aymara Relationship: Sociolinguistic Scenarios and Possible Archaeological Evidence
in: Paul Heggarty and David Beresford-Jones (eds.). 2012. Archaeology and Language in the Andes, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 345-72.


Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

What about loan translations? Towards a cross-linguistic study of calques
March 13, 2014 15:00
Speaker: Joseph T. Farquharson (University of Bielefeld)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Seminar room U 2.50 (Primatology)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333



E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Focus function without focus encoding
March 11, 2014 13:30
Speaker: Tom Güldemann
Work in progress at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Seminar room H4.10/H4.11 (4th floor, on top of the lecture hall)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Zero arguments in Teop (Oceanic language family, Bougainville)
February 14, 2014 10:00
Speaker: Ulrike Mosel (Universität Kiel)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Seminar room H 4.10 / H 4.11 (4th floor, on top of the lecture hall)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Generalizations about serial verb constructions
February 11, 2014 13:30
Speaker: Martin Haspelmath (MPI-EVA)
Work in progress at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room H4.10/H4.11 (4th floor, on top of the lecture hall)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

The proto-history of Lingala in the pidginization of Bobangi and related issues
February 10, 2014 15:00
Speaker: Michael Meeuwis (Ghent University)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Seminar room H 4.10/ H 4.11 (4th floor, on top of the lecture hall)

Abstract:
Holm (1988: 73) wrote that a few exceptions notwithstanding, descriptions of what most creoles looked like in their pidgin stage, and sometimes even the fact itself that they go back to such a stage, are a matter of reconstruction, as historical records documenting such stages are often absent. For Lingala, or better “proto-Lingala” (i.e., the pidginization of Bobangi, see Meeuwis 2013), we do have historical records documenting this: archives, unedited manuscripts, military and missionary reports, etc. all document the changes Bobangi underwent in the 1880s and 1890s. The grammatical structures and processes (generalization, lexicalization, demorphologization, debonding (Norde 2011), etc.) attestable in these sources will be discussed. But shortly after this stage, Lingala underwent some processes of decreolization (broadly defined, for expansion was not only based on Bobangi but on other adstrates as well) and calques from French. A number of features in the APiCS list for which this is the case will be reviewed. Finally, and relatively unrelated to the two previous discussions, it is my intention if time allows to discuss some APiCS features whose Lingala values need a ‘footnote’ or two.



Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Diversity Linguistics Seminar
February 07, 2014 09:30
Speaker: Martin Haspelmath & Susanne Michaelis
Diversity Linguistics Seminar

more information

Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Abstract:
Alexandre, Nélia & Tjerk Hagemeijer. 2007. Bare nouns and the nominal domain in Santome. In Marlyse Baptista & Jacqueline Guéron (eds.), Noun phrases in creole languages, 37–59. Amsterdam: Benjamins.


Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Contact-induced hybridity in Cimbrian nominal composition
January 28, 2014 13:30
Speaker: Guus Kroonen (University of Copenhagen & MPI-EVA)
Work in progress at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Diversity Linguistics Seminar
January 24, 2014 09:30
Speaker: Martin Haspelmath & Susanne Michaelis
Diversity Linguistics Seminar

more information

Location:
Seminar room U 4.10/U 4.11 (4th floor, on top of the lecture hall)

Abstract:
Croft, William. 2013. Agreement as anaphora, anaphora as coreference. In Dik Bakker & Martin Haspelmath (eds.), Languages across boundaries: Studies in memory of Anna Siewierska, 95–117. Berlin: De Gruyter Mouton.

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Proto Witoto-Ocaina-Nonuya and no distant relation with Bora and Muinane
January 24, 2014 12:00
Speaker: Juan Alvaro Echeverri (Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Leticia) & Frank Seifart (MPI-EVA)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Abstract:
In this talk we present our reconstruction of 204 Proto Witoto-Ocaina-Nonuya forms, based on contemporary data from these three languages from the North West Amazon. Comparison of these forms with Proto Bora-Muinane reveals that a genealogical link between Witotoan (Witoto, Ocaina, and Nonuya) and Bora (Bora and Muinane), proposed by Aschmann (1993), cannot be substantiated.


Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Marking possession: a new approach to locus and agreement
January 23, 2014 15:00
Speaker: Marlou van Rijn (University of Amsterdam & MPI-EVA)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Identifying prehistoric contact words: in search of a cross-linguistically applicable method
December 16, 2013 15:00
Speaker: Guus Kroonen (Copenhagen University / MPI-EVA)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Remarks on evidentiality in Finnish
December 12, 2013 13:30
Speaker: Seppo Kittilä (University of Helsinki / MPI-EVA)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Máku: life, death and miracles of an Amazonian language isolate
December 09, 2013 15:00
Speaker: Raoul Zamponi (University of Macerata & MPI-EVA)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Abstract:
The extinct Máku language was once spoken by a group of the same name (pronounced ['mako] or ['maku] in Máku) located, at the beginning of the last century, along the Upper Uraricoera and Auaris rivers (Koch-Grünberg 1913:457) in the extreme northwest of the present day Brazilian state of Roraima. The Máku were a little more than 50 in 1925, distributed in two malocas (long houses): one along the Upper Uraricoera and the other along the Padamo river. By 1950, there was one Máku family of eight or nine people left in the lower Uraricoera and, a decade later, only three people could speak the Máku language (Migliazza 1965:26). In 1969, two known speakers of Máku remained: a man about 50 years old, Sinfrônio Magalhães, and his sister, Maria, approximately five years older (Migliazza 1980:115). They were living together in Mangueira, a village near the Uraricoera stretch of river just below Maracá Island (the Maracá Channel), and working in the Boa Esperança farm, approximately four miles away. Sinfrônio and Maria had found refuge in Mangueira in 1936, aged about 15 and 20 years respectively, following the breaking up of their home-community. In the year 2000, with the death of Sinfrônio in Boa Vista (capital of the state of Roraima), about six years that of Maria, the language ceased to exist (viz. to be remembered).

In terms of genetic affiliation, Máku is a linguistic isolate (Koch-Grünberg 1913:457, Loukotka 1968:151, Migliazza 1965:1, Rodrigues 1986:95). An attempt has been made to relate it to the geographically close Uruak and Sapé languages (Greenberg 1987), but no significant evidence has been found; claims to the contrary in the literature may be safely disregarded.

Materials on the Máku language were gathered on six occasions during the past century: in 1912 by Koch-Grünberg (word lists), in 1927 by João Barbosa de Faria (word lists), in 1958 and in 1964 by Ernesto C. Migliazza (tape-recorded words, phrases, sentences, and texts), in 1986 by Aryon Dall’Igna Rodrigues (tape-recorded sentences and words), and in 1990 by Iraguacema Lima Maciel (words and some tape-recorded short texts).

My talk will explore, on the basis of all the available material, some basic grammatical aspects of Máku and its contacts with the languages of its neighbours in Northern Amazonia (Arawak, Cariban, Tucanoan, and Yanomami languages).





Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Syntactic corpus annotation in Ancient Greek
December 06, 2013 13:30
Speaker: Giuseppe G. A. Celano (University of Leipzig, Digital Humanities Group)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Talking Neolithic: The Indo-European Homeland Problem versus the Origin(s) of the First European Farmers
December 02, 2013 08:00
Speaker: Bernard Comrie (Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology), Guus Kroonen (Copenhagen University)
Workshop at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Seminar room H 4.10 / H 4.11 (4th floor, on top of the lecture hall)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/conference/2013_talking_neolithic/index.html

Cultural evolution within and across language: big data, the language barrier and a new field of study"
November 04, 2013 13:00
Speaker: Gregory Crane (University of Leipzig & Tufts University, Boston)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Central seminar room (U4.10)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

The Yukaghir Interjections and Russian, Yakut and Even influence
October 16, 2013 15:00
Speaker: Samona Kurilova (Institute of Humanities and North minority Peoples' Problems, Yakutsk, Russia / MPI-EVA)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Seminar room H 4.10/H 4.11 (4th floor, on top of the lecture hall)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Language transparency. A typological study of interface simplicity
October 10, 2013 15:00
Speaker: Sterre Leufkens (University of Amsterdam & MPI-EVA)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Seminar room H 4.10 / H 4.11 (4th floor, on top of the lecture hall)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Toward an integrated typology of causative/applicative syncretism
October 09, 2013 15:00
Speaker: Bradley McDonnell (University of California, Santa Barbara & MPI-EVA)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Seminar room H4.10/H4.11 (4th floor, on top of the lecture hall)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

The role of preadolescents and adolescents in contact-induced change: intentionality and effect
September 11, 2013 15:00
Speaker: Malcolm Ross (Australian National University & MPI-EVA)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Seminar room H4.10/H4.11 (4th floor, on top of the lecture hall)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

The role of positive evidence in breaking the speech code
August 22, 2013 13:30
Speaker: Alan Langus (SISSA – International School for Advances Studies, Trieste Italy)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Abstract:
Young infants can perform powerful computations to break the speech code. During the first year of life infants can use Transitional Probabilities (TPs) to find words from continuous speech and extract algebraic rule following repetition patterns. We show that by relying on TPs alone, linguistic input in 8 different languages contains more statistically probable but unheard syllable sequences than actual words. Unconstrained statistical learning based on TPs alone cannot therefore result in word learning. Instead, this kind of combinatorial explosion that yields many novel sound sequences may be useful for learning grammatical rules. We carried out a series of experiments where 6-month-old infants and adult participants were familiarized with a speech stream where TPs defined words and the statistically probable but unheard syllable sequences instantiated algebraic rules. We show that by 6-months of age infants know that they should ignore statistically probable but unheard phantom words when learning words, but use these phantom structures for generalizing abstract rules.

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Modern Japanese transitivity pairs from a frequency perspective
August 21, 2013 15:00
Speaker: Heiko Narrog (Tohoku University, Sendai) & Prashant Pardeshi (National Institute for Japanese Language and Linguistics, Tokyo)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Abstract:
Japanese has a rich inventory of intransitive/transitive and transitive/ditransitive lexical verb pairs. This presentation will look at the verbs from a frequency perspective. We will test the hypothesis put forward in Haspelmath et al. (2013) and elsewhere that the less (or least) coded item in a set of related item is more (most) frequent and the more (most) coded item is less (least) frequent. Our investigation is based on a large corpus of Modern Japanese (the Balanced Corpus of Contemporary Written Japanese).

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Association for Linguistic Typology 10th Biennial Conference (ALT 10)
August 15, 2013 09:00 to August 18, 2013
Speaker: Please consult website
Conference at the Department of Linguistics, University of Leipzig

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Location:
University of Leipzig, downtown campus

Contact:
ALT 10 Organizing Committee
Department of Linguistics
Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology
Deutscher Platz 6
04103 Leipzig
Germany

E-mail: ALT10[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/conference/2013_ALT10/

Agreement, Word Order and Case in the Western Iranian Languages
August 08, 2013 13:30
Speaker: Mohammad Dabir-Moghaddam (Allameh Tabataba'i University & MPI-EVA)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Spanish-English contact in Southern California: An ecological view
August 01, 2013 13:30
Speaker: Fred Field (California State University, Northridge & MPI-EVA)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

"The Development of Ablaut in Sumatran Malay"
July 25, 2013 15:00
Speaker: Timothy McKinnon, Peter Cole & Gabriella Hermon (U Delaware & MPI-EVA (Jakarta field station)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Word-class-based and construction-based approaches to language description
July 16, 2013 13:30
Speaker: William Croft (University of New Mexico / MPI-EVA
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

An unreliable typology of DP versus NP
July 12, 2013 13:30
Speaker: Jaklin Kornfilt (Syracuse University & MPI-EVA)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Abstract:
In a series of studies, Bošković (e.g. 2012, to appear) proposes a linguistic typology based on a posited dichotomy between languages whose “traditional” NPs are actually DPs and languages where the relevant projection does not go beyond the level of NP. One immediate clue for the relevant type of a language in this respect would be whether it has articles or not. More interestingly, Bošković proposes additional properties which a language would or would not exhibit, depending on whether it is an “NP-” or a “DP-” language (e.g. NP-languages disallow clause-mate NPI (=Negative Polarity Item) licensing under Neg-Raising, and DP-languages allow it; only DP-languages allow the majority superlative reading; inverse scope is unavailable in NP-languages). In a related study, Bošković & Şener (2012) claim that Turkish is an NP-language, and that it therefore exhibits the properties which Bošković’s system would ascribe to it. They further posit a structure of the NP from which the relevant properties of Turkish would follow.

In this talk, I shall challenge some of the details proposed for the structure of Turkish NPs as well as the posited correlation between the NP/DP “typology” and the properties which are claimed to be found in “DP-“ versus “NP- “languages, and illustrate my criticism via examples mainly from Turkish, but also from German and English.

Selected references:

Bošković, Z. (to appear) “Phases beyond clauses”; to appear in Nominal Constructions in Slavic and Beyond; L. Schürcks, A. Giannakidou, U. Etxebarria, P. Kosta (eds.)

Bošković, Z. (2012) “On NPs and Clauses”; in Discourse and grammar: From sentence types to lexical categories; G. Grewendorf and T. E. Zimmermann (eds.); 179 – 242.

Bošković, Z. & S. Şener (2012) Turkish NP; unpublished ms., University of Connecticut

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Cormac Anderson University of Leipzig "Problems of Celtic phonology in comparative perspective" Montag, 8. Juli, 15 Uhr
July 08, 2013 15:00
Speaker: Cormac Anderson (University of Leipzig)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Seminar room H 4.10/H 4.11 (4th floor, on top of the lecture hall)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Aspects of the diachronic typology of non-canonical subjects
June 28, 2013 13:30
Speaker: Ilja A. Seržant (University of Konstanz)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333


E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

"Transitivity, corpus linguistics and language typology"
June 24, 2013 15:00
Speaker: José M. García-Miguel (University of Vigo / MPI-EVA)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Seminar room H 4.10/H4.11 (4th floor, on top of the lecture hall)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Morphomes for typologists
June 21, 2013 13:30
Speaker: Greville C. Corbett (Surrey Morphology Group/MPI-EVA)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Workshop on electronic dictionaries of minor languages Workshop at the Department of Linguistics
June 10, 2013 09:30
Speaker: Martin Haspelmath et al.
Workshop at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Contact:
Martin Haspelmath
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: haspelmath[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/conference/2013_electronic_dictionaries/index.html

S/TAM/P Morphs in the Macro-Sudan Belt
June 04, 2013 13:30
Speaker: Gregory D. S. Anderson (Living Tongues Institute for Endangered Languages (Oregon) & University of South Africa (UNISA))
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Seminar room U1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Abstract:
Portmanteau morphs that simultaneously encode the referent properties of subjects in addition to TAM categories and polarity–so-called S/TAM/P morphs (Anderson 2011, 2012, 2013)–are commonly attested in languages of the Macro-Sudan Belt (Güldemann 2008, cf. Dimmendaal 2008, Sands 2009), a large areal complex stretching west to east across equatorial Africa that encompasses languages belonging to a number of different genetic units. In certain genetic units, S/TAM/P morphs appear to be old formations, and one can even reconstruct them back to an earlier proto-language, e.g. Proto-Benue-Congo. Further, S/TAM/P morphs exhibit a tendency to be drawn into the verb in a process of univerbation that yields different prefixal series in individual languages or language families, e.g. in certain Kwa languages or Chadic. Some of these prefixal series can also be projected back to earlier proto-language states, for example in various constituent families of the Central Sudanic stock. In this presentation I offer some perspectives on the areal distribution and possible origins of both free-standing S/TAM/P morph constructions and verbal prefix series in languages from the Macro-Sudan Belt, exemplified with data from a range of different genetic units found from across this region.

Anderson, G. D. S. 2011. Auxiliary Verb Constructions in the Languages of Africa. Studies in African Linguistics 40 (1-2): 1-409.

Anderson, G. D. S. 2012. S/TAM/P morphs in the history of Benue-Congo and Niger-Congo conjugation. Presented at Niger-Congress, Paris, September 2012.

Anderson, G. D. S. 2013. S/TAM/P morphs in Central Sudanic languages. Presented at the 11th Nilo-Saharan Linguistics Colloquium, Köln.

Dimmendaal, G. 2008. Language ecology and linguistic diversity in Africa. Language and Linguistics Compass 2 (5): 840-858.


Güldemann, T. 2008. The Macro-Sudan Belt: towards identifying a linguistic area in northern sub-Saharan Africa. In Heine, B. & D. Nurse (eds.) A Linguistic Geography of Africa,151-185. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.


Sands, B. 2009. Africa's Linguistic Diversity. Language and Linguistics Compass 3 (2): 559-580.

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Towards ethnogrammar
April 29, 2013 15:00
Speaker: Daniel Everett (Bentley University, Massachusetts)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Central seminar room H4.10 (4th floor, on top of the lecture hall)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

The grammar of happiness
April 29, 2013 18:00
Speaker: Daniel Everett (Bentley University, Massachusetts)
Film at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Lecture hall

Abstract:
(http://www.smithsonianchannel.com/site/sn/show.do?show=141519)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Multilingual behaviours in sign language users
April 10, 2013 13:30
Speaker: Ulrike Zeshan (University of Central Lancashire, International Centre for Sign Languages and Deaf Studies)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Genome-wide data substantiate Holocene gene flow from India to Australia
April 04, 2013 10:00
Speaker: Irina Pugach and Mark Stoneking
Geneling meeting

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Location:
Seminar room U1.50

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Semantic and Syntactic Bootstrapping and the Formation of Grammatical Categories: Arguments from Tolai of New Britain
March 28, 2013 14:00
Speaker: William A. Foley (University of Sydney)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Seminar room H4.10 (4th floor)

Abstract:
Bootstrapping is a commonly cited mechanism by which children acquire the categories of their native language (Carey 2009). This is typically invoked as the means by which children learn the claimed universal distinction between the syntactic classes noun and verb (Pinker 1994): on the basis of presumed universal cognitive/semantic prototypes, such as countable objects and dynamic events, children identify lexemes belonging to these opposed classes (semantic bootstrapping), note their distinctive grammatical properties, and then extend the categories previously formed to new lexemes on the basis of shared grammatical properties (syntactic bootstrapping). Tomasello (1992, 2003) has shown that contrary to what we might expect from this simple opposition of object/noun to event/verb, the age at which children learning English can be identified as having formed these categories (ie syntactic bootstrapping) differs: verbs cohere into a unified syntactic class in the grammar of children acquiring English significantly later than nouns (Tomasello’s (1992) verb island hypothesis). This is explicable in the light of Gentner and Boroditsky’s (2001) hypothesis of cognitive versus linguistic dominance in language acquisition: because event denoting lexemes or verbs are higher in linguistic dominance (syntactic bootstrapping) and lower in cognitive dominance (semantic bootstrapping) than object denoting lexemes or nouns, we might expect a delay in their coherence into a unified category until a greater facility in the language being acquired is attained. Indeed, we might go further: if NO unique and global syntactic properties can be identified by the child for the lexemes that denote events of various types as opposed to those that denote objects, then no coherent syntactic class of verb may ever emerge in the grammar of the language being acquired, even for adult competence. Hence, we might have a syntactic category of noun, albeit itself weak, but none of verb. The paper will argue in detail that Tolai (aka Kuanua) is such a language. Note, that contrary to much of what has been argued in the typological literature, establishing that a language has a syntactic category of noun does not establish a noun-verb distinction. That is faulty logic: it simply establishes a category of noun. A coherent category of verb requires independent evidence, and as this paper will argue, such evidence is lacking in Tolai.



References

Carey, S. 2009. The Origin of Concepts. Oxford University Press.

Gentner, D and Boroditsky, L. 2001. Individuation, relativity and early word learning. In Bowerman, M and Levinson, S, eds., Language Acquisition and Conceptual Development, 215-256. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Pinker, S. 1994. The Language Instinct. Morrow.

Tomasello, M. 1992. First Verbs: A Case study of Grammatical Development. Cambridge University Press.

Tomasello, M. 2003. Constructing a Language. Harvard University Press.



Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

On the relationship between articulatory, acoustic and perceptual properties of vowels and its consequence for annotating the timber of vowels
March 08, 2013 13:30
Speaker: Jacqueline Vaissière (Université Sorbonne Nouvelle & CNRS-LPP)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

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Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Referential markers in Oceanic nominalized constructions
December 03, 2012 15:00
Speaker: Claire Moyse-Faurie (Lacito-CNRS, Paris)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Abstract:
My talk will be concerned with some referential compatibilities and restrictions in Oceanic nominalized constructions. Regardless of whether a nominalizing affix is required or whether the nominal context is sufficient in itself to license a verb in a noun phrase position, Oceanic languages exhibit various restrictions on the occurrence of referential markers (tense-aspect-mood and negative markers, articles) in phrasal/clausal nominalizations. More often than not, action nominalization (i.e. propositional/activity/state nominalization) goes together with non-finiteness in the verbal domain, as well as with restrictive compatibilities in the nominal domain (e. g. in the choice of articles). In most languages, however, nominalized clauses partake both in nominal and verbal properties. It is indeed these mixed features, and the variations observed across languages, that make them very interesting to study. I will examine these referential compatibilities and restrictions, taking into account the different functions of the nominalized constructions, and the fact that in some languages tense-aspect markers also convey argument indexing, which tends to block their use in nominalized constructions. Nominalization and deverbalization processes are said to be correlated with hierarchy constraints, and in the last part of my talk I will try to sort out if the principles put forward by some linguists are justified by the Oceanic data.

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Workshop "Mainland Southeast Asian Languages: The State of the Art in 2012"
November 29, 2012 to December 01, 2012
Speaker: Please consult workshop website given below.
Workshop at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig Seminar room H4.10 (4th floor)

Contact:
Organized by Bernard Comrie (MPI EVA) and Nick Enfield (MPI Nijmegen)

Local organizer: Claudia Schmidt (MPI EVA)


E-mail: cschmidt[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/conference/2012_MSA_Languages/

Session on Southern New Guinea languages
November 26, 2012 14:00
Speaker: Nicholas Evans & Christian Döhler
Presentation at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room U2.50 (Primatology)

Abstract:
(1) Fieldwork in Southern New Guinea (Nicholas Evans & Christian Döhler)

(2) Problems of aspect in Nen (Nicholas Evans)

(3) Valency in Kómnzo (Christian Döhler)


Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone +49 (0) 341 35 50 300
fax +49 (0) 341 35 50 333


E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Cross-linguistic diversity and patterns of variation in primate tool use: Drawing the analogy
November 20, 2012 13:30
Speaker: Anneliese Kuhle (Freie Universität Berlin)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room H4.10 (on top of the lecture hall)

Abstract:
Language diversity is taken as the key argument for explaining the origin of grammatical categories in natural languages in terms of cultural-historical development. As a result, only so-called general cognitive abilities in the human individual can be postulated for their acquisition. An important question arising in this context is what this general cognition must be like and how it can sustain a learning process that leads to language-specific competences whose particular form and meaning is the result of cultural, not biological, development. In this talk, I would like to suggest that research in behavioral science, in particular the study of tool use traditions in great apes, can shed new light on this cognitive basis, and hence the kind of psychological factors which must – and are already shown – to play a role in language use. The argument will be based on evidence for cross-linguistic / cross-group variation from both language typology and field primatology. For illustration of linguistic research, I will turn to field data concerned with the grammatical encoding of reciprocity (the grammatical expression of ‘each other’ meanings), focusing on languages from Aboriginal Australia and the Pacific region. The emerging pattern for cross-linguistic variation in reciprocal marking will be juxtaposed to patterns of variation in nonlinguistic tool use (e.g., nut-cracking behavior), as carved out by primatologists working on great ape populations (Pan troglodytes) in different parts of Africa. I will suggest that if in both cases the argument for geographic variation is invoked as evidence for a cultural origin, then the cognitive basis for language use, too, must be sought for in the domain of intentional, problem-oriented behavior associated with nonlinguistic tool use. I would like to show that “the tool use analogy” offers the possibility for functional linguists to ground their evidence for cross-linguistic, cultural variation on a more concrete model of prelinguistic cognition, which not only demonstrates the emergence of cultural behavior without postulating innate categories, but also presents a very useful perspective for determining and justifying the kind of psychological factors which, under synchronic/proximate conditions, must be causal factors for language development.




Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

(Non)-Parasitic Mirativity and Markedness
November 12, 2012 15:00
Speaker: Tyler Peterson (University of Toronto)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Yeniseian historical linguistics
October 18, 2012 15:00
Speaker: Edward Vajda (Western Washington University & MPI-EVA)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room H 4.10 (3rd floor, on top of the lecture hall)

Abstract:
This talk summarizes recent advances in understanding the evolution of Yeniseian languages, including the family’s complex areal interaction with the surrounding Turkic and Uralic languages and its ancient connection with Na-Dene in North America.

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

A Construction Grammar perspective on how word order is established in creole genesis
October 10, 2012 15:00
Speaker: Claire Lefebvre and Renée Lambert-Brétière (Université du Québec à Montréal)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Abstract:
Word order in creoles does not systematically reflect that of their contributing languages. This puzzle has generated a significant amount of research from different perspectives. On the basis of a sample of Caribbean creoles, this paper addresses the question of how word order is established in a relabelling-based account of creole genesis within the framework of Radical Construction Grammar (RCxG) (Croft 2001).

The RCxG framework is non-modular such that there is no strict separation between the lexicon and the syntax. The grammar is constituted of various constructions, i.e. pairings of forms and meanings. All types of linguistic units (morphemes, words, phrases, clauses, sentences, texts) have constructional properties; not only are morphemes and words listed in the lexicon but also constructions (e.g. def n). Within this framework, relabelling applies to all types of syntactic units including complex constructions.

In line with this framework, we make the following assumptions. First, word order is not specified as part of individual lexical entries. Second, word order is specified as part of the constructions in which individual words appear (e.g. q def adj n). Third, complex constructions as well as morphemes are part of the lexicon.

These three basic assumptions have the following consequences for a relabelling-based account of creole genesis. First, individual words are relabelled without directionality specifications such that they have some freedom as to where they may surface. Second, superstrate words such as adjectives and determiners have to occur in combination with nouns in order to be identified as such by the creators of a creole. The relabelling of words of these categories thus has to proceed on the basis of the mi­nimal constructions in which they appear in the superstrate language. Third, constructions of the substrate languages are available to the creators of a creole.

In this paper, we show that these assumptions and their consequences for a relabelling-based account of creole genesis allow for a straightforward and principled account of how the various word orders are established in creole genesis. For example, because superstrate modifiers have to occur in combination with nouns in order to be identified as such by the creators of a creole, our analysis predicts that the word order of creoles' Adjectives, numerals and quantifiers will follow that of the superstrate language:

(1) N adj num q Fongbe

q num adj N adj French

q num adj N adj Haitian

Likewise, because a superstrate form has to occur in combination with a noun in order to be identified as a potential form to relabel a determiner, our analysis predicts that the word order of creoles' determiners (and eventually of other functional categories), will follow that of the superstrate language form that has provided the new label for the original substrate functional item:

(2) a. N def Fongbe b. N def Fongbe

def N là French this N English

N la Haitian di(si) N Saramaccan

We demonstrate that this innovative approach also allows for a principled account of all the other word order phenomena, including that of demonstrative terms, postpositions, etc.

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Workshop: Tone: Theory and Practice
September 28, 2012 09:00 to September 29, 2012
Speaker: Please consult website for more information.
Workshop at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room H4.10/H.4.11 (4th floor, on top of the lecture hall)

Contact:
Claudia Schmidt
fax +49 (0) 341 35 50 333

E-mail: cschmidt[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/conference/2012_Tone/

Markedness effects in valency alternations
September 24, 2012 15:00
Speaker: Andrej Malchukov (University of Mainz & MPI-EVA)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Designing spoken corpora for cross-linguistic research in lesser-known languages
September 21, 2012 15:00
Speaker: Amina Mettouchi (Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, Paris & MPI-EVA)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Causatives in Marathi
September 17, 2012 15:00
Speaker: Prashant Pardeshi (National Institute for Japanese Language and Linguistics, Tokyo & MPI-EVA)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Khoisan comparative phonology
August 31, 2012 15:00
Speaker: Hirosi Nakagawa (Tokyo University of Foreign Studies, Japan / MPI-EVA)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Sound change across generations: the rise of vowel neutralisation in the North Russian variety
August 29, 2012 15:00
Speaker: Alexander Krasovitsky (University of Oxford & University of Surrey & Humboldt Foundation)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Japanese transitivity pairs through time
August 27, 2012 13:30
Speaker: Heiko Narrog (Tohoku University, Sendai & MPI-EVA)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Documenting Laz, an endangered language
August 24, 2012 15:00
Speaker: René Lacroix (Université Paris 3 & MPI-EVA)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Complex sentences: Clause order, syntactic structure, and grammaticalization
August 22, 2012 15:00
Speaker: Holger Diessel & Karsten Schmidtke-Bode (University of Jena)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

The interaction of state, prosody and linear order in Kabyle (Berber): Grammatical relations and information structure
August 09, 2012 15:00
Speaker: Amina Mettouchi (Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, Paris & MPI-EVA)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room H4.10 (on top of the lecture hall)

Abstract:
This talk presents a corpus-based analysis of the interaction of three formal means that, together, are the building blocks of information structure constructions, and allow under some conditions the unambiguous coding of subject and object grammatical relations on nouns : the state distinction (absolute/annexed), prosodic boundaries, and linear ordering.
We show that in only two information structure constructions are nominal subjects and objects transparently/unambiguously coded in Western Kabyle: topicalizations of events or states, or recapitulations/summaries of a previously narrated episode.
This encoding can be expressed as follows :
a) a noun is a nominal subject if and only if, within the prosodic group of the verb:
- the verb has no bound pronouns other than the subject affix AND the noun occurs before the verb;
- the noun occurs after the verb and is in the annexed state.
b) a noun is a nominal object if and only if, within the prosodic group of the verb, the noun occurs after the verb and is in the absolute state.
The findings imply that grammatical relations are not necessarily coded on nouns in Western Kabyle, and trigger the question of the functional motivation of this limited encoding, and of the typological profile of languages with such partial encoding.



Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

What sound change, phonotactics and aglossic speech reveal about the essence of speech communication
August 02, 2012 15:00
Speaker: John J. Ohala (University of California, Berkeley)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Lecture Hall (2nd floor)

Abstract:
Speech communication involves an exchange of elements between speaker and hearer. I argue that those elements – the ‘coin’ as it were – are acoustic modulations of the carrier signal. In support of this view I examine three domains.

First, sound change should be examined for what does not change. For example, the reflexes of PIE *ekwos, “horse”: Latin equus, Greek hippos give evidence that what did not change in the medial stop was transitions having low F1 and F2.

Second, common cross-language phonotactics show that robust acoustic modulations are characteristic of those sequences that are common and persist (e.g., ta, twa, sta, etc.) whereas weak modulation are characteristic of those that are absent or rare (e.g., wu, ji, bw-, etc.).

Third, studies going back to 1630 of aglossic speech (speech without a tongue) testify that speech produced without this organ is quite intelligible.

Although the articulations in such cases may not resemble those in intact speakers, the sounds produced are similar enough to be recognizable. The listener is an equal partner in the exchange of these basic elements of speech and attends particularly to moments in the speech signal where there are rapid modulations in any of several acoustic parameters: voicing, amplitude, periodicity, spectrum.

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone +49 (0) 341 35 50 300
fax +49 (0) 341 35 50 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Natural selection in morphosyntax: How attractor states persist and expand diachronically
July 25, 2012 15:00
Speaker: Johanna Nichols (University of California, Berkeley & MPI-EVA)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Word-Shape Alternations in Sumatran Malay
July 20, 2012 13:30
Speaker: Timothy Mckinnon, Peter Cole & Gabriella Hermon (University of Delaware / MPI-EVA (Jakarta field station)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Computational Geolinguistics and Diasystemic Modelling of Meso-American Languages: Scope and Results
July 20, 2012 15:00
Speaker: Jean Léo Léonard (Paris 3-CNRS & IUF) & Vittorio dell’Aquila (CELE, Milan & Vaasa)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Abstract:
The Meso-American (morpho)Phonology project (MAmP2009-2014, IUF) explores four dimensions of descriptive and theoretical linguistics:

i) computational geolinguistics and diasystemic typology;

ii) documentation of endangered languages and varieties;

iii) modelling grammars, through a thorough revision of available data, with a strong focus e.g. on recent theories, such as Paradigm Function Morphology;

iv) geolinguistic data processing for interdisciplinary research,through dialectometry and cladistics.

The MAmP project addresses these issues through the scrutiny of Amerindian languages spoken mainly in Mexico and Guatemala: two linguistic stocks (Mayan, Otomanguean) and one isolate (Huave/Ombeayiüts).

Moreover, the MAmP project is strongly committed to cooperative work and training in applied linguistics with indigenous communities, in collaboration with local NGO (Non Governmental Organizations) and official institutions involved in language planning.

This lecture will provide a survey of three results attained so far:

v) prototypes of linguistic atlases from etymological dictionaries and monographs;

vi) modelling and disentangling inflectional classes in Mazatec, from a diasystemic standpoint;

vii) implementation of databases and computational geolinguistic engineering for language planning and educational needs.

As both an interdisciplinary and empirical endeavour to foster the knowledge and use of indigenous languages of Meso-America, the MAmP project has a strong potential for the benefit of under-resourced languages and for scholars involved in Meso-American studies. The goal of this lecture will be to discuss further developments and implementation of the methodology and results at hand.

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone +49 (0) 341 35 50 300
fax +49 (0) 341 35 50 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Combinatorial model of Russian intonation (to be held in Russian)
July 18, 2012 15:00
Speaker: Sandro Kodzasov (Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Philology, Dept. of Theoretical and Applied Linguistics)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone +49 (0) 341 35 50 300
fax +49 (0) 341 35 50 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

The Diachrony of 'say' in Jamaican Creole: The Convergence of Theories of Creolisation
July 16, 2012 15:00
Speaker: Joseph Farquharson (University of the West Indies & MPI-EVA)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone +49 (0) 341 35 50 300
fax +49 (0) 341 35 50 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Pseudo-incorporation doesn't preclude incorporation
July 12, 2012 15:00
Speaker: Jaklin Kornfilt (Syracuse University & MPI-EVA)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Lecture Hall

Abstract:
Recent literature (e.g. Massam 2001, Öztürk 2005) re-analyzes instances of some phenomena which were analyzed as “genuine” incorporation via head movement as a different phenomenon altogether, dubbed “Pseudo-Noun Incorporation” (PNI), which essentially views the “apparently” incorporated element as an NP which is simply aligned immediately next to the verb (before the verb in head-final languages and after the verb in head-initial ones). No head movement is involved. The “pseudo-incorporated” material is phrasal, rather than an N, as in “genuine” incorporation.


In this presentation, I address some facts from Turkish which have not been widely discussed in the literature to my knowledge, other than in Kornfilt (2003). These are facts that are somewhat reminiscent of Holmberg’s Effect, i.e. the interaction between verb movement and object shift in some Germanic languages, where the latter is contingent upon the former (cf., among others, Holmberg’s work, after whom this relationship is named), as well as of phenomena described under the heading of Specificity Effect (cf. work by Diesing and others), whereby subextraction from non-specific phrases is possible, while such subextraction from specific phrases is not. I argue that, in addition to being stipulative, the “Specificity Condition” on subextraction does not cover all relevant facts of subextraction in Turkish, when interacting with the specificity of the hosts of the extracted subconstitutents. Instead, I argue that what makes the successful instances of subextraction possible is head-movement of the noun heading the non-specific potential host, adjoining to the verb. Thus, what’s at stake here is a form of the Government Transparency Corollary (Baker 1988), possibly recast in more recent terms as Phase Extension (cf. den Dikken 2007 a., b.). Such an explanation would not be available, if the relevant Turkish facts were instances of PNI, i.e. were best characterized as a simple concatenation of a bare NP and a verb, as claimed in Öztürk (2005). I then turn to apparent problems for the head-movement based analysis of these Turkish facts, pointed out by Öztürk, and show, based on adjacency requirements (and their loose nature) of (other) complex verbs in Turkish, that the problems are indeed only apparent. Finally, I discuss the difference between this type of (Pseudo-)Noun Incorporation and the instances originally discussed in Baker (1988), where NI results in changes with respect to the valency of the verb, while the instances addressed in this study do not trigger such changes.

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone +49 (0) 341 35 50 300
fax +49 (0) 341 35 50 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Jesuit Grammarians in the Chaco: Their Analytical Strengths and Weaknesses
July 11, 2012 15:00
Speaker: Willem de Reuse (University of North Texas & MPI-EVA) (in collaboration with Raoul Zamponi, University of Macerata)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Abstract:
The Society of Jesus, more than any other order missionizing in the New World, put a special value upon learning the indigenous languages, and if Jesuits wrote grammars of them, they were often quite perceptive and rigorous. While there is a large literature regarding Jesuit language policies and engineering in the reductions of the Guarani, Chiquitano, Chaco, and Mojo areas of South America, the literature on their actual grammar-writing aptitudes is still small (notwithstanding the recent work in volumes edited by Hovdhaugen, Wendt, Zwartjes et al., and Zimmermann). After 1664, the ban on non-Spanish clergy in the New World was lifted, and Jesuits with non-Spanish language backgrounds brought a variety of analytical skills with them. Although it has been claimed that the education of Jesuits was so international that their native language background would have mattered little (Zwartjes 2010), this paper will argue that native language background and nationality mattered to some extent. Illustrations will be provided from the Chacoan languages Abipon (Guaycuruan) as described by the Austrian Dobrizhoffer (1782), and Lule, as described by the Sardinian Machoni [Maccioni] (1732). For example, while most authors, regardless of what language they were native speakers of, did their best to write indigenous languages with orthographic systems based on Spanish, they sometimes implicitly used conventions from other languages. So Machoni (1732) appears to use, in a few Lule words, the digraph with an Italian value of [š]. Such a convention was also used by other Italian Jesuits such as Antonio Magio in his grammar of Baure, an Arawak language of the Mojo area in Bolivia (Adam and Leclerc 1880). Analytical shortcomings include the non-recognition of important morphological categories, when these did not exist in any other languages the Jesuit was familiar with. A striking example is Maccioni’s non-recognition of instrumental prefixes in Lule verbs, who were recognized only in the nineteenth century. This non-recognition is probably not due to lack of such prefixes in grammars of European languages, but rather because other indigenous languages Maccioni might have been familiar with (from the Andean, Guarani, Chiquitano, Mojo, and other Chacoan areas) do not have anything comparable. (There exist, however, instrumental prefixes in the Cahuapanan family of the Peruvian Amazon). A few comparisons with early work by other religious orders in Latin America will also be made.

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone +49 (0) 341 35 50 300
fax +49 (0) 341 35 50 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Laryngeal-pharyngeal ontogeny: Speech in the first several months
July 10, 2012 15:00
Speaker: John Esling (University of Victoria, British Columbia)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Contact:
Claudia Büchel
phone +49 (0) 341 35 50 300
fax +49 (0) 341 35 50 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Typological Diversity in Anaphoric Systems
July 09, 2012 13:30
Speaker: Peter Cole, Gabriella Hermon and Yanti (U Delaware & MPI-EVA (Jakarta fieldstation))
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Contact:
Claudia BÖchel
phone +49 (0) 341 35 50 300
fax +49 (0) 341 35 50 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

What is gained from documentation of some languages in the Chaco (Bolivia, Paraguay, Argentina)?
July 03, 2012 15:00
Speaker: Lyle Campbell (U Hawai\'i)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Contact:
Claudia BÖchel
phone +49 (0) 341 35 50 300
fax +49 (0) 341 35 50 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

"Workshop on language cataloguing and language reference collections"
July 02, 2012 09:00
Speaker: Martin Haspelmath (MPI-EVA), Sebastian Nordhoff (MPI-EVA), Harald Hammarström (MPI-EVA & U Nijmegen), Gisela Lausberg (MPI-EVA library), Lyle Campbell (U Hawai\'i, ELCat), Debbie Garside (GeoLang Ltd, Wales), Jost Gippert (U Frankfurt/Main)
Workshop at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room H 4.10 (third floor, on top of the lecture hall)

Abstract:
Programme



9h00-9h10 Welcome



9h10-10h00 Nordhoff, Hammarstrm, Haspelmath: Introduction to Glottolog/Langdoc (http://www.glottolog.org/)



10h00-10h30 Lausberg: Introduction to Language Description Heritage (http://ldh.livingsources.org/)



break



11h00-12h00 Campbell: Introduction to ELCat (Endangered Languages Catalogue, cf. http://www.lat-mpi.eu/latnews/2011/09/the-endangered-language-catalog-elcat/)



12h00-13h00 Garside: Introduction to ISO 639-6 and GeoLang (http://www.geolang.com/)



break



14h00-15h00 Gippert: Tree-based classifications of languages and lects and their problems



15h00-15h45 Nordhoff, Haspelmath: Linguistic Linked Open Data (LLOD) and cross-linguistic databases



break



16h15-18h00 General discussion


Contact:
Claudia Schmidt
fax +49 (0) 341 35 50 333

E-mail: cschmidt[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

"Auxiliary verbs in languages of the Tarahumara area: A typological continuum of internal diversity"
June 27, 2012 13:30
Speaker: Zarina Estrada (University of Sonora, Mexico, and MPI-EVA)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Contact:
Claudia Bchel
phone +49 (0) 341 35 50 300
fax +49 (0) 341 35 50 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

"Mediaeval conceptions of time and Old Croatian verb lexical aspect (aktionsart) in the Slavic context"
June 25, 2012 15:00
Speaker: Amir Kapetanović (Institute of Croatian Language and Linguistics, Zagreb & MPI-EVA)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Contact:
Claudia Bchel
phone +49 (0) 341 35 50 300
fax +49 (0) 341 35 50 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

"How do languages keep their selves straight?"
June 15, 2012 13:30
Speaker: David Kamholz (UC Berkeley)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Abstract:
Abstract:


It is normal in many languages for the speaker to imagine a hypothetical scenario where he places himself in the addressee's situation, generally expressed in English with the conditional if I were you. These sentences exhibit what I will call split-self semantics -- the speaker mentally transfers part, but not all, of himself onto the addressee. This gives rise to interesting pronominal reference phenomena, as in the difference between (a) if I were you, I would hate me (where me refers to the speaker) and (b) if I were you, I would hate myself (where myself refers to the hybrid speaker-addressee). Based on a survey 17 languages, I show that there is significant cross-linguistic variation in the grammatical means used to express the contrast between (a) and (b). This variation is not straightforwardly explicable in terms of other grammatical features, and must for now be considered an independent parameter to be learned by speakers.

Contact:
Claudia Bchel
phone +49 (0) 341 35 50 300
fax +49 (0) 341 35 50 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

"A semantic typology of complement insubordination"
June 12, 2012 15:00
Speaker: An Van linden (Catholic University of Leuven & MPI-EVA) (in collaboration with Jean-Christophe Verstraete & Sarah d’Hertefelt)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Contact:
Claudia Bchel
phone +49 (0) 341 35 50 300
fax +49 (0) 341 35 50 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

"Languages with more second language speakers tend to have reduced case systems"
June 11, 2012 15:00
Speaker: Bodo Winter (University of California, Merced / MPI-EVA)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Contact:
Claudia Bchel
phone +49 (0) 341 35 50 300
fax +49 (0) 341 35 50 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

"The cultural dimension of pidgin and creole genesis"
May 30, 2012 13:30
Speaker: Christine Jourdan (Concordia University, Montreal)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Contact:
Claudia Bchel
phone +49 (0) 341 35 50 300
fax +49 (0) 341 35 50 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

"Speaker perspective as a catalyst for change in case systems"
May 22, 2012 13:30
Speaker: Shobhana L. Chelliah (University of North Texas)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Abstract:
The predominant case marking pattern observed for Tibeto-Burman is non-obligatory morphological marking of A (transitive subject) and often the same marking of S (intransitive subject) under various pragmatic and discourse conditions which cast A or S as a contrastive topic or an otherwise foregrounded NP. This motivation for marking makes it difficult to characterize Tibeto-Burman case systems under existing case-marking typologies. Furthermore, when surveying recent descriptions of ergative languages (e.g. Gooniyandi (McGregor 2010), split-ergative languages (e.g. Hindi and Nepali (Butt& Poudel 2007)), nominative-accusative languages (e.g. Korean (Kwon& Zribi-Hertz 2008)), and active-stative languages (e.g. Northern Pomo (Deal& OConnor 2010), we see A /S marking curiously parallel in distribution to that found in Tibeto-Burman. In each instance, pragmatics or discourse structure determines the distribution of A/S marking. It has been argued that case systems with pragmatic or discourse motivated marking have evolved from one of the known case-marking types due to language contact or obsolescence. Given the cross-linguistic tendency for A/S case marking to develop contrastive topic readings even with robust languages that have undergone little contact, it would appear that some other factor is at work. I will argue that these atypical case systems have developed through a general process of language change by which certain grammatical categories increasingly reflect speaker perspective.

Contact:
Claudia Bchel
phone +49 (0) 341 35 50 300
fax +49 (0) 341 35 50 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

"Life after the PhD"
May 11, 2012 14:00
Speaker: Jean-Jacques Hublin (Director, Department of Human Evolution, MPI-EVA)
Uri Tadmor (Editorial Director, de Gruyter Mouton)
Kornelius Kupczik (Research Fellow, University of Jena)
Kathleen Schlütter (Kompetenzschule ELSYS/Research Acade
PhD Lecture Series

more information

Location:
Lecture Hall (2nd floor)

Abstract:
Dear fellow PhD students:

Sooner or later we all have to ask ourselves: What will I do after I get my PhD?

We, your PhD Representatives of MPI-EVA, want to address this topic (LIFE AFTER THE PHD) with
the next PhD Lecture Series event, which will not only address the What will I do? question, but
also questions like:


What options do people with a PhD have?

What kind of career choices are there?

What kind of funding opportunities may be right for my project?

How does one go about finding a job outside of science?


Since a single lecture by just one person is unlikely to address all possible career paths, or funding
opportunities, we have decided to organize this event as a panel discussion and job fair-style meet
and greet with individuals who represent various options for seeking employment and funding
post-PhD both within and outside of academia. Our panel of experts will consist of the following
people:


Jean-Jacques Hublin (Director, Department of Human Evolution, MPI-EVA)

Uri Tadmor (Editorial Director, de Gruyter Mouton)

Kornelius Kupczik (Research Fellow, University of Jena)

Kathleen Schltter (Kompetenzschule ELSYS/Research Academy Leipzig)



PANEL DISCUSSION
Friday, May 11th, 2012 @ 2pm
2nd floor lecture hall


Get to know the panelists and join us for soft drinks and snacks after the lecture @ the
MEET & GREET / INFO FAIR @ 3pm in the Entrance Hall



Looking forward to seeing you all at the lecture,

Your PhD Representatives

Contact:
PhD Representatives
phone +49 (0) 341 35 50 304
fax +49 (0) 341 35 50 333

E-mail: phd_representatives[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de

"Mood and modality in Zamucoan languages (Bolivia and Paraguay)"
May 09, 2012 15:00
Speaker: Luca Ciucci (Scuola Normale Superiore, Pisa & MPI-EVA)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Meeting room at the department of Human Evolution (small meeting room with the glass wall on the right side when you enter the department)

Abstract:



Contact:
Claudia Bchel
phone +49 (0) 341 35 50 300
fax +49 (0) 341 35 50 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Morphological complexity: Workshop on Diachrony
April 28, 2012
Workshop at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig

Contact:
Claudia Schmidt
phone +49 (0) 341 35 50 329
fax +49 (0) 341 35 50 333

E-mail: cschmidt[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www2.surrey.ac.uk/english/smg/researchprojects/morphologicalcomplexity/workshop_2012/

Anna Siewierska Memorial Workshop
April 27, 2012 09:00
Workshop at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Central seminar room (4th floor)

Contact:
Claudia Schmidt
fax +49 (0) 341 35 50 333

E-mail: cschmidt[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/conference/2012_ASMW/

"On nominal and verbal morphology in Harakmbut (Amazonian, Peru)"
April 16, 2012 15:00
Speaker: An Van linden (Catholic University of Leuven & MPI-EVA)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Contact:
Claudia Bchel
phone +49 (0) 341 35 50 300
fax +49 (0) 341 35 50 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

"The effect of linguistic distance on learning Dutch as a second language: towards feature configurations in L2 learnability"
March 27, 2012 15:00
Speaker: Job Schepens (Radboud University, MPI Nijmegen / MPI-EVA)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Contact:
Claudia Bchel
phone +49 (0) 341 35 50 300
fax +49 (0) 341 35 50 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

The antipassive function of the middle forms in a cross-linguistic perspective
March 21, 2012 15:00
Speaker: Katarzyna Janic (University of Lyon & MPI-EVA)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Contact:
Claudia Bchel
tel. +49 (0) 341 3550 300

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Phonology of two Eastern Tukanoan (Amazonian) languages in typological perspective
March 20, 2012 15:00
Speaker: Elsa Gomez-Imbert (Université de Toulouse & ERSS)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Contact:
Claudia Bchel
tel. +49 (0) 341 3550 300

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Tense-Aspect-Modality and evidential categories in Chechen
March 14, 2012 15:00
Speaker: Zarina Molochieva (University of California, Berkeley & MPI-EVA)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Contact:
Claudia Bchel
tel. +49 (0) 341 3550 300

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

"Learning, Skill and Language: Acquisition and Dissolution"
February 16, 2012 15:00
Speaker: Henri Cohen (MPI-EVA)
Lecture for PhD students

more information

Location:
Seminar room H 4.10 (4th floor, on top of the lecture hall)

Abstract:
Henri Cohen will be giving a lecture on "Learning, Skill and Language: Acquisition and Dissolution" on February 16th at 3pm. This lecture will have an introductory character and will thus be suitable for everybody (no prior knowledge in language acquisition or linguistics in general is required).




More information about Henri Cohen can be found here: http://www-old.psycho.univ-paris5.fr/spip.php?article2119



Here is a brief abstract of the lecture:



In this presentation, I shall offer an overview of the memory and learning systems, their function and neuroanatomy (briefly), their relationship to language acquisition and the influence of disease on these systems and language. I view language as a skill. The literature on skill acquisition and consolidation can be informative with respect to questions regarding acquisition, the poverty of stimulus argument, and bilingual competence and performance. The format is open: questions and interruptions are welcome.



Contact:
Claudia Bchel
phone +49 (0) 341 35 50 300
fax +49 (0) 341 35 50 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

"Is Ts'ixa (Eastern Kalahari Khoe) a case language?"
February 13, 2012 13:30
Speaker: Anne-Maria Fehn (Universität zu Köln)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Contact:
Claudia Bchel
phone +49 (0) 341 35 50 300
fax +49 (0) 341 35 50 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

“Say What?”: Grammaticalization Paths of Say in some Formosan and Philippines Languages
February 13, 2012 15:00
Speaker: Lawrence A. Reid (University of Hawai‘i)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Abstract:
The verb say is one of the most common sources of grammaticalization change in languages of the world. It has been extensively discussed for a wide range of languages, including English and other European languages, African languages, Chinese, and Tibeto-Burman languages, but its developments in Austronesian languages have received relatively little attention. This paper will trace a wide range of changes involving this verb in a number of Formosan and Philippine languages, including its development as various kinds of evidential and attitudinal adverbs, aspectual verbs, quotative ligatures, interrogative and request forms, indefinite nouns and verbs, possessive pronouns, adverbs of similarity and immediacy, conditional and purpose clause complementizers, and even exonyms, etc. Parallels will be shown where relevant with non-Austronesian languages, and attempts to refine the notion of grammaticalization especially as it involves morphosyntactic changes involving the verb say will be made.

Contact:
Claudia Bchel
phone +49 (0) 341 35 50 300
fax +49 (0) 341 35 50 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

The Development of “Applicative” Constructions in Western Austronesian Languages: Toward a Comparison and Reconstruction
February 09, 2012 15:00
Speaker: Ritsuko Kikusawa (National Museum of Ethnology, Japan & The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Japan)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room H 4.10 (4th floor, on top of the lecture hall)

Abstract:
Typological analysis and classification are inevitable for the historical comparison and reconstruction of morphosyntactic characteristics of languages, however, it is well recognised by both typologists and historical linguists that mere pattern comparison can often lead us to wrong conclusions. In this presentation, using on-going work on the historical comparison of applicative constructions in Austronesian languages, I will demonstrate how we can integrate pattern comparison with lexical reconstruction. Key morphemes (that are reconstructed applying the comparative method) are used here as indices for identifying the paths of structural change. How terminology and definition can cause problems in an approach to morphosyntactic reconstruction will also be addressed.

Contact:
Claudia Bchel
phone +49 (0) 341 35 50 300
fax +49 (0) 341 35 50 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

"Historical, Darwinian and contemporary perspectives on the evolution of language"
February 06, 2012 15:00
Speaker: Henri Cohen (MPI-EVA)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Contact:
Claudia Bchel
phone +49 (0) 341 35 50 300
fax +49 (0) 341 35 50 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

"The Lexical Typology of Qualities"
February 02, 2012 10:00
Speaker: Ekaterina Rakhilina (Institute for Russian Language, Russian Academy of Sciences) & Tatiana Reznikova (VINITI, Russian Academy of Sciences)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Abstract:
The talk presents the results of recent research by the Moscow Lexical-Typological Group, dealing with the semantics of qualitative adjectives (like sharp, soft, smooth etc.) in a typological perspective. This lexical class is especially promising for cross-linguistic studies, as it encompasses easily identifiable properties of concrete objects that are not essentially dependent on cultural, historical, or other factors. This means that semantic distinctions observed in this domain in different languages are cognitively grounded, and therefore can be captured in a systematic way. We will discuss our findings for several semantic classes, namely sharp / blunt; soft / hard; smooth / rough; full / empty; old / new / young; alive / dead.



We are focusing on the following issues:



1. Obviously, in any particular language any quality from the list above may correspond to more than one lexical unit. What are then, in this case, the parameters that underlie semantic distinctions between individual words?



2. How consistent are the detected distinctions across languages? How can languages in this respect be compared to each other? The method of semantic maps has proved to be a useful tool in cross-linguistic studies on grammatical categories. How can it be applied in the case of lexical typology and what would correspond to a single node in this map?



3. Our research has shown that certain semantic classes have cross-linguistically more lexical correlates than others. What are the factors that contribute to the richness of a semantic class?



Along with the primary meanings of qualitative adjectives we also examine the meanings they acquire as a result of semantic shift. This study reveals typologically recurrent patterns of metaphorical extensions. Due to these patterns derivative meanings may be crucial to clarifying the conceptual structure of the source domain. In particular, a semantic distinction within a certain field that is not expressed lexically in a given language may still be manifested in the derivative meanings.

Contact:
Claudia Bchel
phone +49 (0) 341 35 50 300
fax +49 (0) 341 35 50 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Position classes re-evaluated
January 30, 2012 15:00
Speaker: Barbara Stiebels (ZAS Berlin/Universität Leipzig)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Abstract:
Morpheme orders of languages with complex morphology may fall between two extreme poles: strictly transparent vs. highly opaque orders. Rule-based/morpheme-based approaches to morphology generally focus on transparent instantiations of morphological sequencing, whereas position class/templatic approaches take opaque instantiations as their starting point. Proponents of position class analyses usually refer to properties such as the lack of headed structures, the "look-ahead" of morphemes, discontinuous dependencies between morphemes, the blocking of expected morphemes, counter-scopal orders and multiple exponence of categories. However, one can also find a rather unreflected use of position classes in many descriptive grammars of languages with complex morphology; there are cases in which position classes have even been postulated for languages with rather transparent morphology. In my talk I will discuss problems of position classes analyses and illustrate which processes may yield template-like outcomes.

Contact:
Claudia Bchel
phone +49 (0) 341 35 50 300
fax +49 (0) 341 35 50 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

"When is ‘regular sound change’ regular?"
January 26, 2012 13:30
Speaker: Mark Donohue (Australian National University/MPI-EVA)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room U 1.50

Abstract:
Abstract



One of the cornerstones of the comparative methods is the principle of regularity of sound correspondences when comparing vocabulary sets. There are two essential elements to this formulation: regularity, and correspondences. If compared vocabulary items are merely similar, but cannot be shown to be regularly similar when compared to a reliable reconstruction, then some version of a non-inherited history is assumed for the word in a language.



At the same time, we know that correspondences are subject to irregularity, reflecting the nature of sound change as a socially transmitted force. This raises an important question: how regular a sound change must be before it can be considered regular?



We examine, empirically, the appearance of regularity (using initial plosives, which have been determined to be a mid-way point between vowels and nasals in terms of variability) in a number of language families. Most particularly, we examine the geographic distribution of regularity, and offer social accounts for the appearance of (ir)regularity in different areas, creating a more nuanced notion of linguistic relatedness and language descent.



The task is repeated for a number of families (Austro-Asiatic, Austronesian, Dravidian, (Indo-)European, Turkish, Uralic), and the different patterns of regularity that are found in the different families are examined and shown to reflect both regular and irregular (that is, second language acquisition) processes of language dispersal in different parts of some families.

Contact:
Claudia Bchel
phone +49 (0) 341 35 50 300
fax +49 (0) 341 35 50 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Towards a Cross-Disciplinary Prehistory? What Linguists Can Learn from Archaeologists — And What They Can Learn from Us …
January 23, 2012 15:00
Speaker: Paul Heggarty & David Beresford-Jones (MPI-EVA)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Contact:
Claudia Bchel
phone +49 (0) 341 35 50 300
fax +49 (0) 341 35 50 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

"Towards a Typology of Countability: Grammatical Number in Dagaare (Gur, Ghana) and Beyond"
January 18, 2012 13:30
Speaker: Scott Grimm (Stanford University/Humboldt University Berlin)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room U 1.50 (Linguistics/Psychology)

Contact:
Claudia Bchel
phone +49 (0) 341 35 50 300
fax +49 (0) 341 35 50 333

E-mail: buechel[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/