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Tatiana Bortolato

Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology
Department of Human Behavior, Ecology and Culture 
Deutscher Platz 6
04103 Leipzig
Germany

e-mail: tatiana_bortolatoeva.mpgde

Research
Curriculum Vitae
Publications

Research

My primary research interest is in the evolution of language. In particular, I am interested in vocal communication in chimpanzees, one of our closest living relatives. I am currently conducting a PhD within the Evolution of Brain Connectivity project under the supervision of Dr. Roman Wittig and Dr. Cathy Crockford. I am studying the vocal repertoire, its complexity and its ontogeny in wild chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus), at the Taï National Park, Côte d’Ivoire.

Curriculum Vitae

Education

2018-ongoingPhD student at Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany
Dissertation: “vocal repertoire, its complexity and its ontogeny in wild chimpanzees”
Supervisors: Dr. Roman Wittig & Dr. Catherine Crockford.
2013-2015MSc. Animal Behaviour
University of Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina
Thesis title: “Begging effect of the shiny cowbird (Molothrus bonariensis) and its host, the house wren (Troglodytes aedon), on the parental supply.”
Supervisor: Dr. Vanina Fiorini
2009-2012 BSc. Biology
University of Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires, Argentina

Field experience

2017-2018Taï chimpanzee project, Ivory Coast.
Research assistant – Collecting behavioural data and urine samples investigating maternal effects on behavioural, hormonal and cognitive variation as part of Patrick Tkaczynski postdoc research. Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Germany.
2016-2017Vervet monkey project, South Africa. 
Research assistant – Collecting long term behavioural data on vervet monkeys for Barrett-Henzi lab, Canada.

Publications

Bortolato, T., Gloag, R., Reboreda, J. C., & Fiorini, V. D. (2019). Size matters: Shiny cowbirds secure more food than host nestmates thanks to their larger size, not signal exaggeration. Animal Behaviour, 157, 201-207.
DOI    BibTeX   Endnote   

Meeting Abstract

Bortolato, T., Girard-Buttoz, C., Wittig, R. M. & Crockford, C. (2019). Development of vocal articulation complexity in wild chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus). Workshop Behaviour and Brain Evolution in Primates 2019, Erice, Sicily, Italy.