26.05.2017 - 18:51
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Contact

Department of Human Evolution

Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology

Deutscher Platz 6
04103 Leipzig

phone: +49 (341) 3550 - 350
fax: +49 (0341) 3550 - 399

e-mail: streiber@[>>> Please remove the brackets! <<<]eva.mpg.de

Debra Colarossi

Post-Doctoral Researcher

Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology
Department of Human Evolution
Deutscher Platz 6
04103 Leipzig
Germany

phone: 0049 (0) 341 3550 862
fax: 0049 (0) 341 3550 399
e-mail: debra_colarossi@[>>> Please remove the brackets! <<<]eva.mpg.de

Profile

Debra Colarossi is a postdoctoral researcher specializing in optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating within the Department of Human Evolution. She has a strong background in luminescence dating and experience with multiple luminescence signals from both quartz and feldspar, including quartz OSL, quartz violet stimulated luminescence (VSL)  and K-feldspar post-infrared infrared stimulated luminescence (post-IR IRSL) at both multiple and single grain level. Her research focuses on utilising multiple luminescence chronometers to extend the upper age limit of the luminescence dating technique. Her strong luminescence background is complemented by extensive experience in geology, geomorphology and physical geography, having worked in numerous environmental settings.

Debra holds undergraduate degrees in teaching and geology. During her MSc research at the University of the Witwatersrand in South Africa she used OSL dating to establish the timing of deposition of tributary fan sediments, exposed in donga (gulley) systems, along the Nyl/Mogalakwena River in South Africa. This lead to her doctoral research at Aberystwyth University into the fundamental principles of luminescence dating and its application to determine the driving factors of deposition and erosion, and the switch between them, by accurately dating episodes recorded in Quaternary sediments. 

Debra joined the Department of Human Evolution in March 2017 were she will be responsible for dating archaeological sites across Europe and Africa. She is also keen to continue her research into the fundamental principles of multiple luminescence chronometers, with a view to extending the upper age range of the technique.