21.04.2015 - 07:03
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Kontakt

Max-Planck-Institut für evolutionäre Anthropologie

Deutscher Platz 6
04103 Leipzig

Tel.: +49 (341) 3550 - 0
Fax: +49 (341) 3550 - 119

E-Mail: info@[>>> Please remove the brackets! <<<]eva.mpg.de

Veranstaltungen

Volga German today
April 21, 2015 13:30
Speaker: Darja Appelganz (MPI-EVA)
Work in progress at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room H 4.10 /H 4.11 (4th floor, on top of the lecture hall)

Contact:
Jessica Fiegert
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: jessica_fiegert[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

The role of population migration in human cultural and biological evolution
April 24, 2015 14:00
Speaker: Peter Bellwood, School of Archaeology and Anthropology, Australian National University, Canberra
The Institute Seminar Series

more information

Location:
MPI-EVA, Lecture Hall, 2nd floor

Abstract:
- 14:00 Peter Bellwood: The role of population migration in human cultural and biological evolution

- 15:30 Discussion and soft drinks just outside the lecture hall


Some information on the speaker and a list of his publications can be found at https://researchers.anu.edu.au/researchers/bellwood-ps


The series featuring external speakers takes place roughly every two months and typically on Friday early afternoons. There is one speaker per session who will speak for 60 minutes with up to 30 minutes for questions. Refreshments are provided at the end of the sessions. The committee organizing the seminar series consists of: Aida Andrés, Catherine Crockford, Paul Heggarty, Federico Rossano, Alexander Stoessel, Sandra Jacob and Jörg Noack. Please contact any of them with comments or suggestions.

Contact:


E-mail: instituteseminar[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de

A typology of high vowel reduplication
April 28, 2015 15:00
Speaker: Njoya Ibirahim (University of Hamburg)
Talk at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room H 4.10 /H 4.11 (4th floor, on top of the lecture hall)

Abstract:
High vowel reduplication (hereafter HVR) consists of prefixing to a given stem a copy of its onset followed by an underspecified high vowel. It is a process widespread in West Africa only. This talk has two main goals. First, it provides a description of HVR formal and functional types, and investigates the co-relation between HVR forms and functions cross-linguistically. Second, it revisits previous analyses of high vowel reduplication, provides support for some claims and suggests ways to ameliorate others towards a unified approach of high vowel reduplication.

In relation to the first goal, it results that high vowel reduplication spreads over two phyla, Chadic and Niger-Congo. From a formal perspective, three patterns are identified cross-linguistically depending on the reduplicant (RED) vowel: HVR Type I pattern with a fixed reduplicant; HVR Type II with a quasi-fixed reduplicant; and HVR Type III with a variable reduplicant. Regarding the function, it is shown that HVR is used similarly as other types of reduplication across languages to mark iconic (intensification, plurality, diminution) and non-iconic (word formation and inflection) functions. From a historical perspective, I argue following Faraclas & Williamson 1984 and Steriade 1988 that high vowel reduplication is a case of reduction from full reduplication.

Regarding the second goal, it is argued that the analysis that best accounts for high vowel reduplication as displayed across languages is one in which HVR is considered as a morphophonological process affixing a prosodically underspecified CV[+high] morpheme. The analysis is essentially data based, and the approach combines typology to new trends in generative grammar (Underspecification, feature theory, Autosegmental phonology) to account for high vowel reduplication. Using a purely descriptive approach proves more advantageous. It suggests a way of dealing with a very rich and diverse variety of high vowel reduplication patterns without having to frame any new theoretical approach or postulate any ad hoc rule that fails to apply in certain environments where the same conditions for application are met.

The present study faces fewer problems than previous accounts of high vowel reduplication whereby HVR is considered a purely phonological process. Above all, it has the potential of being generalized, and it exploits frameworks already available to account for high vowel reduplication.

Contact:
Jessica Fiegert
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: jessica_fiegert[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Diversity Linguistics: Retrospect and Prospect
May 01, 2015 to May 03, 2015
Speaker: diverse
Conference at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology Deutscher Platz 6 D-04103 Leipzig Germany

Contact:
Claudia Bavero
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 329
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: diversity_linguistics[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/linguistics/conferences/diversity-linguistics-retrospect-and-prospect/index.html

Experimental Approaches to the Early Stone Age: Four Decades of Research in Africa and Eurasia
May 08, 2015 14:00
Speaker: Nick Toth and Kathy Schick, The Stone Age Institute/Indiana University, Bloomington
The Institute Seminar Series

more information

Location:
MPI-EVA, Lecture Hall, 2nd floor

Abstract:
- 14:00 Nick Toth and Kathy Schick: Experimental Approaches to the Early Stone Age: Four Decades of Research in Africa and Eurasia

- 15:30 Discussion and soft drinks just outside the lecture hall


Some information on the speakers and a list of their publications can be found at http://www.stoneageinstitute.org/staff.html#.VL4LdWNAShk


The series featuring external speakers takes place roughly every two months and typically on Friday early afternoons. There is one speaker per session who will speak for 60 minutes with up to 30 minutes for questions. Refreshments are provided at the end of the sessions. The committee organizing the seminar series consists of: Aida Andrés, Catherine Crockford, Paul Heggarty, Federico Rossano, Alexander Stoessel, Sandra Jacob and Jörg Noack. Please contact any of them with comments or suggestions.

Contact:


E-mail: instituteseminar[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de

The vowel system of Irish
May 12, 2015 13:30
Speaker: Cormac Anderson (University Leipzig & MPI-EVA)
Work in Progress at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room H 4.10 /H 4.11 (4th floor, on top of the lecture hall)

Contact:
Jessica Fiegert
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: jessica_fiegert[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

The morphosyntax of number systems: a crosslinguistic study. Preliminary analysis and first insights
May 19, 2015 13:30
Speaker: Jessica Ivani (University of Bergamo & MPI-EVA)
Work in Progress at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room H 4.10 /H 4.11 (4th floor, on top of the lecture hall)

Contact:
Jessica Fiegert
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: jessica_fiegert[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

The nominative case in Baltic
May 26, 2015 13:30
Speaker: Ilja Seržant (Johannes-Gutenberg-University of Mainz & Vilnius University)
Work in Progress at the Department of Linguistics

more information

Location:
Seminar room H 4.10 /H 4.11 (4th floor, on top of the lecture hall)

Abstract:
The paper is a semasiological study on the nominative case in the Baltic languages, including both syntactic and semantic aspects. This nominative case is "unusual" in many respects. It is morphologically marked in almost all declensions and numbers by dedicated affixes. At the same time, the nominative case is a necessary (non-nominative subjects in terms of syntax are virtually non-existent in Baltic) but not sufficient condition for subjecthood in Baltic, only its combination with verb agreement provides safe evidence. This is because the nominative case can also mark "direct" objects and time adverbials (I have been working for two days). Furthermore, different NP types if marked by the nominative have different degrees of correlation with subjecthood. In addition to subject-related functions, I discuss the functions of the nominative case with time adverbials and with nominative objects. Thus, nominative objects is a productive category in Latvian (in its debitive construction), exhibiting a number of non-subject properties but retaining the nominative case. As regards, nominative time adverbials, I claim that they – in contrast to their accusative alternates (in terms of a "differential time adverbials marking") – encode emphasis (cf. Frey 2010 on the notion) which I test on the basis of a multivariate analysis.

Contact:
Jessica Fiegert
phone + 49 (0) 341 3550 300
fax + 49 (0) 341 3550 333

E-mail: jessica_fiegert[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de
Website: http://www.eva.mpg.de/lingua/

Measures of maturation in early fossil hominins
June 26, 2015 14:00
Speaker: Prof. Dr. Christopher Dean, Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University College London, UK
The Institute Seminar Series

more information

Location:
MPI-EVA, Lecture hall, 2nd floor

Abstract:
- 14:00 Christopher Dean: Measures of maturation in early fossil hominins

- 15:30 Discussion and soft drinks just outside the lecture hall


The earliest hominins were bipedal, had reduced canine size and some had bigger brains than living great apes. All this suggests a way of life that differed in many ways from great apes today. Evidence for the pace of growth in early hominins comes from preserved tooth microstructure. A record of incremental growth in enamel and dentine persists that allows us to reconstruct tooth growth and compare key measures of dental maturation with modern humans and living great apes. An important question is whether, among the first fossils attributed to early Homo, there was shift towards a more prolonged period of development and whether there was a slow modern human-like period of growth between the end of weaning and the beginning of puberty. If, despite their different way of life and diverse diets, these aspects of early hominin development were indistinguishable from either earlier australopiths and/or from living great apes then this must be interpreted in the context of their life history biology.


Some information on the speaker and a list of his publications can be found at http://www.ucl.ac.uk/cdb/research/dean


The series featuring external speakers takes place roughly every two months and typically on Friday early afternoons. There is one speaker per session who will speak for 60 minutes with up to 30 minutes for questions. Refreshments are provided at the end of the sessions. The committee organizing the seminar series consists of: Aida Andrés, Catherine Crockford, Paul Heggarty, Federico Rossano, Alexander Stoessel, Sandra Jacob and Jörg Noack. Please contact any of them with comments or suggestions.

Contact:


E-mail: instituteseminar[>>> Please replace the brackets with an AT sign! <<<]eva.mpg.de